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Broadband: demand drivers

Date: Tuesday, 23 August 2005
Venue: KPMG, Sydney

Time: 2pm - 6.20pm (registration from 1.30pm)

WORKSHOP PROGRAM
SESSION 1 (2:00-3:00) The state of play
Malcolm Alder
, Director, Information, Comms & Technology, KPMG
Roger Buckeridge, Executive Director, Allen & Buckeridge
- The progress and the gaps in broadband rollout and take-up.
- What is happening around the world: how do we compare, and what can we learn?
- Where to focus investment and national policy (if any)?

SESSION 2 (3:20-4:20) Health, education and public services
Ian Reinecke
, CEO, National eHealth Transition Authority
Peter Nissen, National Broadband Advisor for Education
- Examples of applications installed now, and lessons from the early experience?
- How wide is the gap between what is available and what is needed?
- Are hospitals and schools the key targets, or do we need ubiquity?
- Are Australian governments trying hard enough to make it happen?

SESSION 3 (4:50-6:20) Media and information
Steve Vamos, Managing Director, Microsoft Australia
Robert Hutchinson, Manager, Interface, ABC
Mike Game, COO, Fairfax Digital
- What broadband capacity do media and entertainment need?
- Services which would, or could, be in the pipeline if there was enough capacity?
- Which of the many new platforms are attracting the strongest demand in Australia?


Issues:
What are the needs of services and applications of the market: games, movies, music, education, health, IPTV, video telephony? Or is the strongest demand coming from plain old personal communication and business data?  Is the right approach just to build, now we know how much business, govt and community depend on it?  How can we accelerate the growth of critical mass for ubiquity and universality?  How do we compare, in productivity and strategies with leaders such as Korea, Japan and Singapore?  What can we learn from the global leaders, and what strategies are already working here?

This workshop combined the experience and thinking of leaders in entertainment, education and health with analysts, researchers and investors.

This was one of our many broadband workshops since the 1990s.  We are committed to offer insights into best practice and building of support for Australian broadband.  You will see our track record, and the number of industry and community leaders, who have joined us in this ongoing effort, if you click on events or publications on this site.

This seminar followed the usual Network Insight Institute format:
* Brief presentations from each panel of speakers, then plenty of time for discussion.
* Very tightly-packed program, with focus on substance; no time-wasting introductions.
* No written papers of speakers, so please be there on the day if you wish to be informed.
* Maximum of 100 participants. 


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